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2017 Mesquite Chamber Directory and Referral Guide

EASTFIELD COLLEGE Eastfield College serves students and communities through shared learning experi- ences, job preparation, economic and workforce development, service learning and community spirit. Eastfield serves people of all ages, from all walks of life, who want to succeed both personally and professionally. Since 1970, Eastfield has welcomed high school students and adults whose common goal is to earn a degree or a certif- icate and to use that knowledge to better them and their communities. In fall 2011, Eastfield had record enrollment serving over 14,000 credit students. Dallas County Community College District (DCCCD) helps students succeed and communities prosper through education, access, workforce and economic devel- opment, and lifelong learning. More than 60 percent of the students who attend Eastfield are enrolled in hun- dreds of freshman and sophomore academic courses that will transfer to four-year universities across the state…guaranteed. Eastfield offers more than 15 technical training/certificate programs that give students the skills they need to succeed in today’s job market. That’s guaranteed, too! Additionally, students are enrolled in training, and lifelong learning to residents of the communities it serves, now and adult education programs that include workforce development, continuing educa- for years to come. tion, and literacy and other basic skills programs. As businesses and industries need an increasingly larger number of well-educated Diversity is reflected in the faces of students who attend Eastfield College. While workers and as more students enroll in college to pursue successful careers, those the average age is approximately 27, students who enroll range in age from 16 to demands drive the need for additional facilities that promote student learning. In 90! They can begin taking dual credit enrollment classes in high school, and older response, Eastfield’s expansive capital building program included the construction lifelong learners are enthusiastic participants in several emeritus programs. The of four major education/learning facilities on its main campus – the Learning Cen- student population is diverse – 33 percent white; 27 percent African American; 34 ter; the Center for Child and Family Studies; the Workforce and Criminal Justice percent Hispanic; 4 percent Asian/Pacific Islander; 1 percent American Indian; and Training Center; and the Career Technology Center expansion. 1 percent non-resident alien/foreign national. Students are DCCCD’s top priority, and the district continues to provide education- DCCCD is taking a pro-active approach to making learning opportunities acces- al opportunities for a diverse population. DCCCD’s tuition – among the lowest of sible to everyone, focusing on how the district can best serve residents of Dallas any community college system in Texas – puts a college education within reach. County and planning for the future by preparing to welcome an estimated Access to higher education is the key to success, and the district seeks to elimi- 20,000 additional students. As part of that response, the district proposed a nate financial barriers for students by offering scholarships, grants, loans and $450 million bond package, which voters passed in 2004. This long-range plan other programs. enabled DCCCD to provide education, economic development, workforce We’re proud to be your neighborhood full-service Credit Union! l Bete r t s Lower fees Great service Frie d polnear www.americascu.org 3001 Motley Dr. Suite H Mesquite, TX 75150 214-227-8306 Monday-Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Federally Insured by NCUA 5


2017 Mesquite Chamber Directory and Referral Guide
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